AP(Eye) on the Hill is our bi-weekly highlight of significant federal updates, particularly those that impact AAPI communities regarding reproductive, immigration, and economic justice. Learn about NAPAWF’s and other national AAPI groups’ federal policy work while you’re out on the ground!

Policy Recap

  • Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testifies on her experience with sexual assault against Judge Kavanaugh
  • Trump administration proposes rule that drastically cuts immigrant access to public benefits
  • Trump decides to lower refugee cap next year to 30,000

 

Dr. Christine Blasey Ford testifies on her experience with sexual assault against Judge Kavanaugh

Photo credit: The Boston Globe

On Thursday, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford bravely testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee, telling her story of when Brett Kavanaugh, Trump’s nominee for Supreme Court Justice, sexually assaulted her. Dr. Ford and Senate Democrats continued to call for an FBI investigation into the case.  Two other women, Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick have also come forward with allegations against Judge Kavanaugh.

 

Trump administration proposes rule that drastically cuts immigrant access to public benefits

Photo credit: National Immigration Law Center

Over the weekend, the Department of Homeland Security officially announced a new rule that expands the definition of “public charge”, a term used to describe an immigrant who is dependent on the US government for subsistence through public benefits. Someone who is labeled a ‘public charge’ can be denied Lawful Permanent Resident status (green card status) or admission to the US. Currently, an immigrant can who is reliant on cash assistance such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) can be labeled a public charge and denied status. Under the new rule, an immigrant who has used Medicaid, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and housing assistance can be considered a public charge. For many immigrant families, this means they would be faced with an impossible decision: seeking affordable healthcare, housing, or food for their family or risking their immigration status.

  • Read our fact sheet on the impact the public charge rule would have on women of color
  • Learn about the specific impact of this rule on the AAPI community
  • Read an in-depth explainer of the new public charge rule

 

Trump decides to lower refugee cap next year to 30,000

Photo credit: HuffPost

Last week, it was revealed that the Department of State plans on lowering the cap of refugees admitted to the states from 45,000 to 30,000. This is a drastic reduction in the number of refugees the US admitted before Trump took office, at 110,000 refugees a year. Although officials are justifying this change by stating that more attention needs to be placed instead on asylees who arrive at the US border, the administration is still trying to implement a rule that would allow immigration enforcement to detain children with their families who are seeking asylum at the border.

  • Learn more about where refugees come from, including a large percentage from Asian countries
  • See fast facts about refugees around the world

 

NAPAWF Legal News

Supreme Court Nomination

What’s at stake for AAPI women with the next Supreme Court nomination? Everything. Check out our two-pager now to learn why Judge Brett Kavanaugh is a threat to AAPI women and families.
 

NAPAWF in the News

We’re hiring!

Want to join a multi-city team working for reproductive justice for AAPI women, girls, trans, and gender nonconforming folks? Help us find our next NAPAWF organizers and manager! We are looking for:


More information is available here: https://www.napawf.org/jobs.html

 

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